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    Gwendal

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    Re: Translation Central

    Post by Gwendal on Sat Oct 19, 2013 10:23 am

    Neosmith: Thanks!

    Here's the last Softbank interview. I have to admit I'm not 100% sure if Yashima is a man or a woman. The dictionary claims "ToshiakI" is a girl's name, but Yashima looks more like a man to me in the photograph on the Monolith website. Still, I could be wrong. Razz

    I'm also going to be away from home for most of the coming week, so unfortunately I probably won't be able to post anything new until next weekend.

    SOFTBANK YASHIMA INTERVIEW

    The hardest part was finding the balance between different points of view (Laughs)

    Interviewer: Mr. Yashima, please tell us a little about how you came to work at Monolith Soft.

    Yashima: I was at a point where the projects I was working on were winding down, and then I got an offer from Sugiura and Takahashi to work with them on a new game. I thought that seemed like a good opportunity.

    Interviewer: What are your main tasks on "Xenosaga"?

    Yashima: Mostly the CG parts, but on the whole I contribute in various ways. The programmers are split into three teams;

    CG, battles and event scenes. Each of them has its own leader, and since I trust all of them, I leave the fundamental work fully up to them. So I mostly make adjusments to make sure the different parts fit together, weed out small errors that might appear when we get to a certain stage of development, and other kinds of polishing along those lines.

    Interviewer: Was it challenging to program for the PS2, compared to the [original] PS?

    Yashima: Yes, it was actually very challenging, but it's also the kind of hardware where you can get great things out of it if you put in the time and effort. Still, that's a quite a big hurdle, having to put in all that effort as a minumum.

    Interviewer: "Xenosaga" is a fully 3D game, but was that always the plan from the beginning?

    Yashima: Yes, it was. That's why we had to do the maps and characters fully in 3D.

    Interviewer: What's the hardest thing you've done in the course of your work so far?

    Yashima: I'm not really sure about the absolute hardest, but to take one example, we could only have 8 characters in a scene at once, so it was pretty tough when I was told they wanted to have 16 instead and to somehow find a way to implement that. (Laughs)
    The hardest thing was probably finding the balance between the points of view from the different teams. (Laughs)

    Interviewer: Thank you very much.

    Gwendal

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    Re: Translation Central

    Post by Gwendal on Fri Oct 25, 2013 2:37 pm

    I'm back again, so I'll just keep going down the list of interviews. Next up is another Sugiura interview.

    GPARA SUGIURA INTERVIEW

    Number 65: Mr. Hirohide Sugiura, Monolith Soft

    Our guest this time is Mr. Hirohide Sugiura, Representative Director at Monolith Soft and one of the creator s of "Xenosaga Episode 1: The Will to Power". We sat down to a talk with Mr. Sugiura, who has contributed to numerous games at companies such as ASCII, Namco, Warp and Square.

    01. "Xenosaga" was just released the other day, so what titles are you working on at the moment?

    Mr. Sugiura: We've already started development on "Xenosaga Episode II". We have to give our fans the continuation [of the story], after all. (Laughs)
    There's also another title in the works, which I can't say more about at the moment...

    02. "Episode II", as well as a new title, then! You've definitely piqued my interest. Mr. Sugiura, you've brought many games into the world , so could you please tell us what you consider the most important factor when you're developing a game?

    Mr. Sugiura: Hmm. I'd say the users' desires, the dreams of the development staff, and balancing costs.

    03. While it's part of the basics, balancing everything has to be difficult. Still, in my opinion you handled that well with "Xenosaga". Let's change the topic a bit now...for gaming in general, what kinds of games do you expect to be popular in the future?

    Mr. Sugiura: The simple answer would be online games, particularly with game packages such as "?". [A little unsure about this part, sorry]
    First, we'll see things with simple controls that allow for simple enjoyment. I think this genre includes games like "Onimusha" and "Dynasty Warriors". Then there will also be character-focused games. Gundam isn't going anywhere, for example. Another recent game that impressed me was "Animal Crossing+". That's quite an unusual game, drawing on your desire to communicate with others.

    04. I see. Here comes my final question: looking at the "Xenosaga" series, it's clear that you've been influenced by various works and people. Mr. Sugiura, could you please tell us a little about what works or people have had the greatest influence on you?

    Mr. Sugiura: Without a doubt, "Legend of Galactic Heroes"! In terms of people, I'd say Ryouma Sakamoto. His way of living has had a significant influence on me. [Probably this guy? http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sakamoto_Ry%C5%8Dma ]

    Interviewer: Thank you for an enjoyable chat. Would you please introduce your friend, too [for next week's interview]?

    Mr. Sugiura: Please welcome Mr. Yoshiharu Gotanda of Tri-Ace.

    Interviewer: Well then, I'm looking forward to next week. As well as Monolith Soft's next games. Thank you very much for today.

    Gwendal

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    Re: Translation Central

    Post by Gwendal on Sun Oct 27, 2013 4:44 pm

    And here's the Mitsuda interview. Not much about Xenosaga, unfortunately.  

    GPARA MITSUDA INTERVIEW

    Number 89: Mr. Yasunori Mitsuda

    This week, we'll be talking to the man behind the music in numerous games such as Square's "Chrono Trigger" and "Xenogears". He's also contributed to many more as a freelancer, such as "Xenosaga Episode 1". Introducing Mr. Yasunori Mitsuda!

    01. First off, please tell us a little about the games you've contributed to in the past, as well as what you're working on now.

    Mr. Mitsuda: I started working at Square when I was 20, making sounds effects and manipulators [?] for "FF5", "Secret of Mana", "Hanjuku Hero 2", "Romanic SAGA2" and more. After that, I contributed [music] to "Front Mission Gun Hazard", "Tobal No.1", "Xenogears" and more, before I left Square in June '97. After I became a freelancer, I've composed music for games including "Street Fighter ZERO 3", the "Resident Evil" drama CD, "Mario Party", "Chrono Cross", "tsugunai" and "Xenosaga Episode 1". My latest project was the Taiwanese PC game "The Seventh Seal", where I contributed 12 musical tracks. During that time, in November 2001, I also ended up becoming the founder of Procyon Studio Ltd. Right now I'm not working on any specific projects, but I'm taking the time I need to create my own album.

    02. Mr. Keizou Kokubo, who appeared in this column last week, was a colleague of yours during the Square days, right? Do you have any strange episodes or other anecdotes you could share with us?

    Mr. Mitsuda: Back when we were developing "Chrono Trigger", we eventually became so busy we couldn't go home at the end of the day anymore, and one time I found Mr. Kokubo about to leave the building carrying a wash basin (bathing equipment) to go to a public bathhouse! I remember that we ended up going there together. After that, it goes without saying that the two of us pretty much lived at the office. (Laughs)
    We also became members of the Ebisu Bathhouse Club, which I grew fond of in many ways. (Laughs)
    There was also the time when composer Uematsu and I went to Mr. Kokubo's parents' house to play table tennis. I kind of feel like we actually had another motive for going there, but...
    That's what the three of us had in common, playing a lot of table tennis and being good at it. (Laughs)

    03. Sounds like you definitely had fun! (Laughs)
    Now, I'd like to change the subject a bit. Mr. Mitsuda, have you had any particular turning points in your life? Also, would you please tell us about the things that have had the greatest influence on you?

    Mr. Mitsuda: That would have to be when I moved from rural Yamaguchi prefecture to Tokyo and started working at Square. As for influences, my father. He doesn't have any understanding of music at all, so he didn't influence me musically, but he did in various other ways (with life in general).

    04. I see. Mr. Mitsuda, if you were to pick one game amongst those you've played so far to crown as "a masterpiece!", which one would it be?

    Mr. Mitsuda: Xanadu. I'm playing it now since it's been reprinted, and you could say it's the grandfather of Japanese RPGs. The world and systems are absolutely wonderful. I like "The Black Onyx" very much too, but I thought I'd pick another game to celebrate it being reprinted. (Laughs)
    What's funny is that the manual that comes with the reprinted versions says, "Compared to ordinary RPGs, this game is very difficult. Depending on the situation, there might be times where you can't proceed in the game."


    That made me laugh. Still, more recent RPGs are rather easy.

    05. That is pretty funny. (Laughs)
    This changing difficulty symbolizes the change in users, doesn't it...? In any case, here's the final question. Mr. Mitsuda, when you're composing music for games, what's the most important thing to focus on in your opinion?

    Mr. Mitsuda: Making sure that game will stay in the user's memories, and in their heart. Also, to make things I think are [truly] great myself (giving myself goosebumps). If you don't do that, the people who play the game definitely won't think it's any good.

    Interviewer: We'll be looking forward to more great music from you that will reverberate in our hearts! (If you found this interesting, we definitely recommend taking a look at Mr. Mitsuda's official website).
    Well then, would you introduce our next friend?

    Mr. Mitsuda: Please welcome Mr. Hitoshi Sakimoto from Basiscape.

    Interviewer: Mr. Sakimoto has also created music for numerous games. That should make for an interesting chat next time, too. Thank you very much for today.

    Neosmith

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    Re: Translation Central

    Post by Neosmith on Mon Oct 28, 2013 12:19 am

    Thanks a lot, Gwendal! Even if there isn't that much about Xeno, it's great to have these for completion's sake.

    Please keep 'em coming. I'm pretty sure Sugiura will have some more interesting things to say in the remaining materials.

    Gwendal

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    Re: Translation Central

    Post by Gwendal on Wed Oct 30, 2013 1:10 pm

    @Neosmith wrote:Thanks a lot, Gwendal! Even if there isn't that much about Xeno, it's great to have these for completion's sake.

    Please keep 'em coming. I'm pretty sure Sugiura will have some more interesting things to say in the remaining materials.

    Thanks. Smile
    Yeah, even if the Xeno information was a bit lacking, it's always nice to hear from Mitsuda. He's probably my favorite video game composer.

    And here's the first half of the Hamamura interview. Some of it feels (the parts where he talks about FFX) feels very familiar from one of the earlier interviews, but I guess that can happen if he's asked the same thing by different publications.

    HAMAMURA SUGIURA INTERVIEW

    Exclusive interview with Mr. Hirohide Sugiura, producer on "Xenosaga Episode I"

    We at Hamamura [magazine? Website?] sat down for an interview with Mr. Hirohide Sugiura, producer on "Xenosaga". We had a very interesting talk about the game's world and system, the sequels, and more.

    Unwavering focus

    Hamamura: My first impression is that you were very focused on the [kind of] image you wanted to present. That must have taken a lot of manpower and effort, didn't it?

    Hirohide Sugiura (from here on, Sugiura): We had to make quite a few compromises with those things. What we actually wanted was to fill the entire game with movies at a "Final Fantasy" (from here on, "FF") level of quality. When we realized that wouldnt't be possible because of the costs involved, director Takahashi became very focused on the 3D [presentation instead].

    Hamamura: Ah, but still, it gives the game a particular flavor. I particularly feel you must have had a strong focus on the length of the movies. In an ordinary RPG, there's often a lot of cutscenes, but in this game it felt more like watching an actual movie.

    Sugiura: Takahashi would personally like to recreate the story he's come up with in higher-dimension images. That would be the ultimate aim. [lit.: "that's where it ends/runs out", I think that's the most likely interpretation]
    Since we chose to present the story as a video game this time, it took the form of very long movie sequences in between the gameplay parts.

    Hamamura: I see. I think it's obvious to see the care that went into those images, if you look at them properly. It has a kind of different quality to it compared to the RPGs we're used to seeing, or rather, it challenges them by using a style of presentation that hasn't been done much in games until now.

    Sugiura: That's a good way to put it, yes.

    Hamamura: But you also paid a lot of attention to the systems, right? In addition to the normal character growth methods, there's also Ether and skills. The characters can be developed in completely different ways depending on the player.

    Sugiura: Yes. But I think we might have gone a little bit overboard with it all. (Laughs)
    Did you have any feelings along those lines too?

    Hamamura: No, I thought it was interesting the way it was? I like games people can talk about and say things like "No, I did it that way instead". I think this game has those kinds of fun elements to it.

    Sugiura: Well, we started creating the systems by trying to include as many features as possible. We intended to cut the unnecessary parts, but once we completed something, we'd look at it and say "no, let's not cut this". (Laughs) "Episode I", and then...

    Hamamura: There's also a lot of depth to the game's setting and worldbuilding. You have special terms like "Realian" that you won't understand until you get some ways into the game.

    Sugiura: We also have some mysteries you'll still be in the dark about even when you've finished the game. (Laughs)
    This game is kind of like our "Star Wars Episode I", so to speak, and when I read Takahashi's plot, the first thing that struck me was that it felt like an opera, like the first act of the "Ring of Nibelung", maybe like the prelude. But since this was the first chapter of the story, we had to introduce the nuances of the various relationships [between the actors] in addition to just building the setting.

    Hamamura: You're talking about "Episode I", but what significance does that number "I" hold, exactly?

    Sugiura: In his mind, Takahashi has already decided on all the particulars about the world he's creating. It definitely doesn't end with the time period and environment we're portraying in this game. With that in mind, this game couldn't take any other form than being "Episode I".

    Hamamura: So then you'll naturally be following it up with "Episode II" and "III"?

    Sugiura: That's right. That is, if our fans are [actually] hoping for "Episode II" ...? With their support, we'll be able to release it.

    Hamamura: I'm also interested in what other activities you're pursuing.

    Sugiura: "Episode II" is a given, but I'd also like to try my hand at new challenges. Ideally, I'd like to throw away what I've done so far and start again entirely from scratch. To be honest, our goal [this time] was "FFX", but rather than matching it, I think we fell short. Next time, I'd definitely like to make something that could stand proudly next to [the competition]. I'd also like to make something to flesh out the "Xenosaga" universe a bit more. I'm not sure if it should be an adventure game or an RPG, but I do want to make something along those lines.

    Gwendal

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    Re: Translation Central

    Post by Gwendal on Fri Nov 01, 2013 3:37 pm

    And here's the second and final part. It's interesting to see how he hints at what would eventually become Baten Kaitos, with the "collaboration" bit.

    2002/03/01 TPS MAGAZINE

    After a lengthy development period, the much anticipated, epic RPG "Xenosaga" was released on February 28. There are probably many of you who have read the article [about this] in "The Play" and are already playing the game. To celebrate the game's successful launch, we sat down with its producer, Mr. Sugiura, to ask him about his current mental state, what went on behind the scenes during development, and the future of the series and Monolith itself.

    It doesn't really feel "over". My work starts now that it's been released

    Interviewer: Now that development is over, how do you really feel about it all; as a company manager, as a producer, and as an individual?

    Sugiura: Until the release date, even if development was over, I didn't really feel like the end was in sight. I want to see it through properly and decide on the conclusion for myself, so I'd say my mental state at the moment is "still worried".

    Interviewer: This interview will be published in the issue that comes out the day after release.

    Sugiura: I don't think we'll be able to draw any conclusions as soon as the day after release. We know the game has been [relatively] popular, so it should be okay, but it's still something I worry about. As for my feelings as an individual, things are different now from what it's been like for a while where I've been feeling like an engine pushed to do a final spurt. But even though the job is done, I don't really feel like I can say "yeah, it's over!". Still, from now on, all we can do is wait.

    Interviewer: It's been a rather long period of development, so is there anything you'd like to say to everyone on the staff?

    Sugiura: Hmm. I already say it every month, but it'd be "well done". Have a good rest, and let's work hard together on the next project too.

    Interviewer: Will you be taking a rest too, Mr. Sugiura?

    Sugiura: I don't think I'll take much time off. Our next project begins in March, and we need to prepare for that. And as I said before, there's also work to be done that starts with the release. There's planning for the next project to be done, solving everyday problems with the staff, and so on. I'm too busy to rest.

    We were able to agree on a shared dream while compromising

    Interviewer: What feelings would you like users to take from this game?

    Sugiura: That's a difficult question to answer, isn't it? The event scenes are rather lengthy, so they took a lot of time to create. That means they might get a sense of a good cost-performance ratio while playing, or rather, feel that they're getting good value for their money. It was a challenge to try to made it different from any other game they might have played before. I'd be happy if they were to keep an eye out for those things while playing.

    Interviewer: What was the hardest and the most enjoyable thing about making this game?

    Sugiura: Quality and balancing the costs. To be more specific, the most difficult thing was to find a compromise between the time and money I was able to provide and the quality director Takahashi wanted to realize in the game. This goes for the game and film industries in general, but if the relationship between the producer and the director deteriorates, you often end up not wanting to work together again. With this game, I'm glad Takahashi and I were able to compromise while still agreeing on a shared dream. That has to be the most enjoyable thing. Looking at the results we were able to achieve, I think we both would find them satisfactory, which is very good. But maybe that's not quite what the term "enjoyable" brings to mind. Things I enjoyed...I can't really think of anything. (Laughs)
    But I had the opportunity to produce a game people I like enjoy, and that makes me personally happy. [That's the gist of it, but it looks like there's also some a set expression in there I don't quite get, maybe to downplay his own achievement somewhat?]

    Interviewer: What scenes or characters in the game are your personal favorites?

    Sugiura: My favorite scene is definitely the last one, the ending. It has wonderful music by Mr. Mitsuda, and it let me remember the game with a feeling of getting goosebumps after reaching the ending after such a long time. I hope you'll all play through to the end. As for the characters, they all have their individuality, and I think they all have elements I enjoy, but personally I'll say Ziggy. This game doesn't really go into detail with his story, but the later games in the series will reflect his backstory more. Then again, that could be said for all the characters.

    I want to try creating a brand you can feel safe playing

    Interviewer: Please tell us a little about your hopes for how the "Xenosaga" series will unfold in the future, as well as Monolith Soft itself.

    Sugiura: When it comes to the "Xenosaga" sequels, which I hope you'll wait patiently for, you'll be able to see the influence of this game quite clearly. Because of that, I'd like as many people as possible to play it. Not just because I want it to be well regarded, but also because I want to receive opinions from many people regarding the development environment and direction of the sequel. So I'd like to get a steady stream of frank views. Sending emails to our company is fine, as is posting on internet message boards. I want to hear everyone's voices. Apart from that, since this was our first game for the PS2, I'd like to try my hand at other platforms too. I want to create brands that aren't necessarily associated with "Xenosaga & Director Takahashi", brands people would talk about in ways such as "this seems interesting, since it's a Monolith game", or "it's a Monolith game, so I feel confident buying it". After that, I'd like to try various things. For example, a collaboration, things like that. Capcom is making things like "Gundam DX" or "Zelda", and that's [an example] of something that would be easy for a development studio like us rather than their [original] makers. To be really bold, I'd like to say "Enix, please let us make a Dragon Quest game!"

    (Laughs)
    Those kinds of jobs would be interesting, eventually. I want to try finding a way to do something like that.

    Gwendal

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    Re: Translation Central

    Post by Gwendal on Tue Nov 05, 2013 12:27 pm

    I know it's been a little longer than usual, but here's the next Mitsuda interview. The delay should be a one-off, and I'll be back to more regular updates from now on. I'll see if can find the next part of the interview, but if I can't, I'll just go on to the Game Watch pages next time.

    2002/02/08 TPS MAGAZINE VOL.27

    Fist part of an interview with Sound Producer Yasunori Mitsuda, to celebrate the release of his [new] CD

    Making orchestral music with the London Philharmonic Orchestra, his collaboration with Joanne Hogg, his computer music, and "Xenosaga", which has become a compliation of the "Mitsuda sound". We talked to him for a behind-the-scenes look at all of these.

    The "+α" you can get from your relationship with the artists is good

    Interviewer: For this game, you collaborated with a foreign artist to make the soundtrack, right? How was that different from making game music on your own?

    Mitsuda: I wouldn't say either way is particularly easier than the other, but I enjoy making music in collaboration with others. There are two reasons for that. First, when I keep making compact [songs] and instrumentals on my own, it ends up becoming very concentrated. I seclude myself completely in it and become confused. When I'm working with another person, I get to hear all kinds of opinions, and the stimulus from that helps me break out of those kinds of [negative] loops. That said, regarding the parts I made on my own for this game, I had so little time that there really wasn't any room for confusion. (Laughs)
    As soon as I'd finished something, I had to move on to the next [track] right away. So it was challenging when I couldn't come up with anything, even if there was so little time. I don't know what would have happened if I didn't get a flash of inspiration just an hour before the deadline...

    Interviewer: When you suddenly get "inspired" like that, do you get various ideas in your head in a single instant? I've also heard some people describe it more like something "raining down".

    Mitsuda: That's right, it feels like of like something comes "raining down". As soon as I see part of a phrase, I can tell how the whole song will go, all the way to end, regardless of the length of the song. It takes hard work to fully grasp that opportunity, but on a good day, I can see the entire construction of the song...including the melody and instrument composition, as a single image. At this point, I'll make a rough outline, and then I just reconstruct it later on the computer. Of course, I'll also include new ideas I've come up with during the course of making that reconstruction, but fundamentally, the computer is just a tool for copying the image I have in my head. That doesn't mean I'll always be completely successful in reconstructing that mental image, so there'll be parts that are degraded and don't feel as vivid. Maybe that's just one of the limitations of working alone to make music on a computer. But when I worked with Joanne and the London Phil on "Kokoro" with a live recording, the opposite situation occured. We managed to create something much better than what I had inside my head. That's the second reason. So all this is why I enjoy working with other artists to create music.

    With specifically written music for each movie, the music and images become a coherent whole

    Interviewer: If you look at the music for this game as a whole, what kind of atmosphere is most prevalent in the tracks?

    Mitsuda: I'd say the piano is fairly central. Or rather, the piano forms the base, and then elements like Gregorian chanting or orchestration are layered on top of it.

    Interviewer: Do you plan to release more original albums in the future?

    Mitsuda: There's a good chance I'll do something that's unrelated to "Xenosaga", but I don't have any plans to make an arranged version or anything like that based on this soundtrack. Everything I wanted to do for this project is already in the game itself. Back in the PS1 era, there was some stress based on the sound quality [lit.: sound source], leading to thoughts like "we should do it again, this is how I really want it to sound". Releasing arranged version CDs was a way to fix that, but I'm satisfied with how "Xenosaga" turned out.

    Interviewer: So with the abilities of the PS2 hardware, you now have the ability to present something you're satisfied with from the beginning?

    Mitsuda: Yes, that's right. To be honest, there's not really any substantial difference between the internal sound source or streaming files. With the internal sound source, the waveform takes up a lot of space, leading to longer loading times, and considering the rest of the game, you can't really dedicate that much space to the music alone. You can have a high-pitch quality version [not sure about this, some kind of technical term?] on a sound CD, but with a game, you'll have to make do with the internal sound source.
    ...that said, with "Xenosaga" there's actually only 3-4 tracks where we use the interal sound source, while the rest are directly embedded in the movie data.

    Interviewer: As for specific uses, are there any tracks that are only played once during the entire game?

    Mitsuda: Yes, we have some of those, too. And some that are only heard two or three times. Since everything has to match the images, with edits to the length of the track and its timing along with the action, there are some subtle differences between them. I also think this is interesting in terms of the "synchronization between images and music" in this game. Personally, I like making "music set to images", so I enjoyed being able to work along the lines of "what image should I realize next, what music should I use to express that?"

    Interviewer: I see. I'd like to enjoy the game [even more] by trying to pay attention to those things.

    The interview continues the week Xenosaga releases (the 3/8 issue)!! We'll do a big reveal on Mr. Mitsuda's treasures!
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    katimus_prime
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    Re: Translation Central

    Post by katimus_prime on Tue Nov 05, 2013 12:49 pm

    Sorry I haven't kept up with these lately, but they're awesome! Thank you for continuing to translate! I wish I could say something more than GHGSDFG I love Mitsuda as much as a person as I do his music and this interview just reminded me.


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    Gwendal

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    Re: Translation Central

    Post by Gwendal on Thu Nov 07, 2013 5:49 pm

    Unfortunately, I couldn't find the rest of the interview, so I started on the Game Watch pages instead. Here's the first half:

    GAME WATCH 1

    Namco opens special event to announce the development of "Xenosaga"!
    There will also be a limited edition of the game

    Planned release: Winter 2001
    Price: TBA

    On July 8, an event announcing the development of the RPG "Xenosaga Episode I: The Will to Power" (Xenosaga from here on) by Namco Ltd. and Monolith Soft Ltd. was held at the Ebisu Garden Hall. There were more than 10,000 applicants from all over the country, and 600 ordinary invitees. The mass media, distributors and the like were well represented. Pamphlets and sound track preview [discs] were given out at the site.

    Namco President, Mr. Nakamura: "Films, music and games are examples of Japan's outstanding culture"

    The first person to go on stage was Namco President Mr. Masaya Nakamura. He started off by saying, with extraordinary emotional attachment, "I hear this tale will be something bigger than 'Xenogears' or the present 'Xenosaga'. With the strong support of the fans, we should be able to publish further sequels going forwards, and so I would like to receive your cooperation". He went on to say, "Until today, I have had no information at all about 'Xenosaga Episode 1: The Will to Power'. Therefore, I would like to share the joy [of this occasion] with our fans who have kindly gathered here today".

    The President, who is also head of the film company Nikkatsu, followed up with "It's often said that film is part of a nation's culture, but this applies to games as well". He finished his greeting by saying, "I would like to see a strong recognition of the fact that films, music and games are examples of Japan's outstanding culture".

    After that, there was a screening of the "Xenosaga" promotional trailer shown at the Tokyo Game Show in spring 2001. It gave a brief summary of some of the information that had already been presented, and the trailer certainly left a strong impression, with the most important keywoards for the story appearing and disappearing while accompanied by a capella background music.

    Left image caption: The event started with Namco President Mr. Nakamura offering his greetings

    Right image caption: There was another screening of the promotional trailer shown at the Tokyo Game Show in spring 2001.

    An explanation of the game systems by Director Tetsuya Takahashi

    The first guest [speaker] of the day, Director Tetsuya Takahashi, made his appearance. In the first public showing of moving images from the game, Director Takahashi conducted some promotion while showing actual in-game footage. He explained that "Xenosaga" will be divided into three aspects; "quest parts", "battle parts" and "event parts". He showed how the "quest parts" would be similar to a regular RPG, with the ability to talk to characters on the map to gather information, breaking open item boxes, obtaining items and so on.

    He also spoke about the process to arrive at the present battle system. He demonstrated how the enemies, drawn to the same proportions as the player characters, will try to make direct contact based on factors such as sound and field of vision, and also how to avoid them. He also explained how it's possible to break trap boxes to get special effects, such as disrupting the enemies with an electrical attack. There will also be strategies for being more effective in battle, such as exploiting an enemy's special characteristics, attacking them from behind or destroying various targets. It also looks like they've prepared traps, such as having enemies come out of boxes you might want to destroy to get the items inside. Further, it seems like it will be possible to obtain something called "battle points" in the quest parts, which will have an effect on character growth.

    The battle parts are based on 3-person parties. If you manage to obtain robots called AGWS, the characters can get in or out of them once per battle. Melee combat is based on regular attacks corresponding to buttons, as well as special attacks than can be learned through the character growth system. AGWS can be summoned from other people, and they can be equipped with weapons using hard points on their body (up to 8). Their close-combat or ranged abilities also differ depending on the robot.

    Top image caption: Director Tesuya Takahashi during his explanation. He talked about ways to avoid direct contact with enemies using guile

    Bottom image caption: The battle parts consist of 3-member parties. Things like attacks using weapons and the characters moving around were demonstrated

    Sounds born of the London Philharmonic Orchestra + Mr. Yasunori Mitsuda

    Sound [work] for "Xenosaga" will be handled by Mr. Mitsuda, who contributed music to "Chrono Trigger", "Gun Hazard", "Xenogears"

    and more. It was made clear that the main background music will be performed by the London Philharmonic Orchestra, and there was a screen of a video interview with Mr. Mitsuda and some footage of the Orchestra's performance environment. The site was soon enveloped in [the sound of] numerous compositions that could be said to be "even more religious-sounding than 'Xenogears'", and in addition to being an undertaking with on a massive scale, [the music] showed a craftmanship that inspires high expecations for the finished game.

    Left image caption: Video interview with Mr. Mitsuda

    Middle image caption: The London Philharmonic Orchestra's performance environment

    Right image caption: Q&

    A session with Director Takahashi and Mr. Mitsuda

    Gwendal

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    Re: Translation Central

    Post by Gwendal on Sun Nov 10, 2013 11:50 am

    And here's the second and final part:

    Then Mr. Mitsuda came in as a guest [speaker]. Director Takahashi reappeared as well, and it turned into a Q&A session.

    Attendee: How was the trial for the orchestral arranging this time?
    Mitsuda: It was harder than I expected. I struggled to create sounds I hadn't thought up myself, so that was very difficult.

    Attendee: What [exactly] was difficult about it?
    Mitsuda: I'd never worked with an orchestra before, so I had to start from scratch and learn, which took up a lot of our time. So the schedule became rather strict.

    Attendee: What were your reasons for choosing the London Philharmonic Orchestra?
    Mitsuda: We had several candidates, but we thought that if were going to do it, we might as well use the most famous one, which was the London Philharmonic.

    Attendee: [To Takahashi] Why did you choose to hire Mr. Mitsuda?
    Takahashi: We've worked together before, and I like the music he makes.

    Attendee: Did you have any particular requests for the tracks?
    Takahashi: They need to [help] explain the scenario, and to convey the length of the scene they're used in. We also work in a 'vague' way where I had him listen to classic and Western movie soundtracks I own, and where he consults with me, so I'd say we worked hard on the creative process.

    Attendee: WHat's your impression of Mr. Mitsuda?
    Takahashi: I get the impression of a person who looks closely at the outside world. We who spend much of our time working in the games industry have an unforuntate tendency to be close ourselves off inside it, but he really seeks out the outside world, which helps stimulate the rest of us too. To me, that's another reason to use the London Philharmonic, to get those new impulses from the outside world. By knowing the outside world, we can broaden our horizons and obtain feedback, which gives us the desire to make a better product.

    Attendee: What did you request with regards to sound production for this game?
    Mitsuda: Not much. Just that we should go ahead and do something on a scale no-one's really done before.

    Attendee: How many tracks did you compose in all, approximately? How well does the game's world match you personally? How do you deal with the expectations from the fans?
    Mitsuda: There's 40-50 tracks in all, and there's many more I haven't composed yet. I like religiously-themed music, which is why I use Gregorian chant, so that's not so different from the game's world. I want to keep on working to make absolutely sure I don't betray the fans' expectations. I'll do my best.

    Attendee: Director, what images do you have in mind for the music and world in this game?
    Takahashi: Religious things are absolutely a motif I wanted to include. Mr. Mitsuda is always trying his hand at new challenges, with a stance that he don't do the same thing over again, so I leave everything up to him and say "do it the way you want, that's fine".

    Attendee: What are your honest reactions to this game?
    Mitsuda: I think [my work] is at a level I might have a hard time surpassing personally. I expect certain things from myself, and I absolutely don't want to let the fans down, so I want to make something good.
    Takahashi: I feel we have something that can really inspire some confidence in ourselves, which is fortunate for the staff too. On the other hand, there's still a ways to go. I'd like to ask everyone to please wait patiently a little longer for the release date.

    After this, a previously unreleased preview compilation of the opening and event scenes was shown.

    Image caption: In the year 200x, a plate is inserted in some mysterious ruins uncovered in Kenya's Lake Turkana. A massive earthquake takes place, and a mysterious island appears. Then a beam of light shoots into space...that's the scene the special trailer started off on. More details about the contents haven't been officially released yet.

    Monolith Soft's representative Mr. Hirohide Sugiura informated about a limited edition release in his address

    Finally, Mr. Sugiura from Monolith Soft Ltd. made his appearance. He spoke with enthusiasm: "Apart from the prologue, the images you've just seen were running on the actual PS2 hardware, and the the event scenes are approximately 70% done. We're now applying further polish to the game. Rather than the graphics, with this game we hope you'll be [eagerly] anticipating the scenario by Mr. Takahashi. In this installment, the story will play out over the course of 6-7 hours' worth of event scenes. These will  include locations, performances including character facial expressions, effects, camera work, lighting, even action scenes with wire stunts [?]. There will be a cast as big as 20 people to bring the characters' emotions to life. With this marriage of technological feats and Mr. Takahashi's scenario, I fully believe this game will be the next great work to succeed "Final Fantasy X" (as an RPG)".

    Then, as a gift to the fans who were there, he gave some information about their decision to release a limited edition of the game. Its price is still to be determined. It will include a 1/10th scale figure (the character will be determined at a later date). Since character designer Kunihiko Tanaka's work has been highly praised, there will also be various other kinds of merchandise. It seems like a way to let the fans get a more leisurely look at the trailer that was released on the day in DVD format is already being considered. Alongside sentiments to help fans who weren't there get a look at the game before the release date as well, the event drew to a close.

    Gwendal

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    Re: Translation Central

    Post by Gwendal on Wed Nov 13, 2013 5:19 pm

    Here's the Xenosaga-relevant part of the second Game Watch.

    GAME WATCH 2

    Tokyo Nation CG Film Festival "TIGRAF"

    The third day showcased games
    Jam-packed with the living voices of the creators

    From November 4-7
    Venue: Roppongi Academy Hills Tower Hall

    The CG festival "TIGRAF" has been part of the Toyko National Festival of Moving Images since last year. The third day, November 6, was dedicated to a "gaming showcase" featuring presentations by well-known creators. This special symposium was made up of four presentations from Monolith Soft Ltd., Square-Enix Ltd., and Mr. Tetsuya Mizuguchi, now a freelancer after the recent closing of United Game Artists Ltd. The last presentation was by Mr./Mrs. Misato [?] Watanabe, representing GTV Ltd. as a modeller.

    "The world of Monolith Soft", offering us a glimpse at the creation of "Xenosaga Episode II" and "Baten Kaitos"

    Monolith Soft's representative Mr. Hirohide Sugiura took to the stage, alongside Monolith employees Norihiro Takami and Taizou Inukai. While showing images from the company's games under development, "Xenosaga I Episode II (EPII)" and "Baten Kaitos", they also talked about rising costs for graphics, and how their company is trying to achieve a better cost-performance ratio in addition to focusing on higher quality, by developing more effectively.

    They started off showing promotional movies for the two titles. While these were based on what was shown at the 2003 Tokyo Game Show, they certainly had a strong impact when shown on such a big screen.

    According to "EPII" Art Director Mr. Takami, "Since the majority of event scenes in 'EPII' are rendered on the actual hardware, we've constructed a real-time demo scene."

    His reasoning for this was that the game [=character?] models could be improved even at the PS2 class [?], while still attaining an acceptable level of quality for the event demo". Or so they seem to have decided. The benefit of doing it this way is that it becomes to possible to lower costs by using the regular models for event scenes, but on the other hand, they might stand out [as looking bad] no matter how much the quality of the movies might be improved.

    Moving on, he introduced the process used to create the otion capture for "EPII"'s event movies. At Monolith Soft, they record the model's coordinate data, while also recording the capture image with a DV camera at the same time. First, they cut the scenario up into storyboards, and the dialogue is recorded in advance. They also adjust the composition of the image at this point, including camera angles. When they get to motion capture, the coordinates are recorded at the studio while the dialogue is playing, and the actor does his or her performance towards the DV camera. Naturally, the amount of material that needs to be recorded for a scene varies with the performance and changes to the scenario, but by planning thoroughly, wasted efforts can be kept to a minimum in order to reduce costs.

    They then go through the event scenes, combined from storyboards+dialogue, DV camera images, and capture data in order, finally turning them into a coherent whole. It was easy to understand how they worked to complete the cutscene, matching the character movements and camera angles in advance.

    But that doesn't mean the process to create the [final] images ends there. Without all those ever-present effects such as rain flowing across the screen, special effects from attacks and rapid camera movements, there would be no sense of your surroundings, and the demo scene would feel empty and sterile.

    This is where the baton was passed to Mr. Inukai, in charge of effects. On the subject of effects, they're about more than just explosions or flashy lights during battles, but also something that affects the visual effectiveness [of the game] in general. Mr. Inukai showed images from "Baten Kaitos" and "EPII" while explaining about what kinds of locations you can actually apply effects to. In actual fact, effects aren't just part of the graphic designer's job; they also require close collaboration with programmers. It seems like there's also some difficulties with doing them in real-time, but [Mr. Inukai] showed us proof of what can be accomplished when you have this kind of collaboration.

    Top image 1: Monolith Soft's Mr. Sugiura
    Top image 2: Mr. Takami (left) and Mr. Inukai (right)

    Bottom image 1: Storyboard. As the scenario develops, dialogue is recorded as well
    Bottom image 2: An actor performing in sync with the dialogue towards the DV camera
    Bottom image 3: The three different processes shown at the same time on one screen
    Bottom image 4: We were introduced to several examples, making the role of effects in "EPII" easy to understand

    Gwendal

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    Re: Translation Central

    Post by Gwendal on Wed Nov 27, 2013 4:21 pm

    Sorry it's been a little while, but just a reminder that I'm still checking in you need anything else translated. Smile

    If not, feel free to send me a PM (here or GameFAQs or wherever) any time later if you find any other interesting Japanese materials.
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    kare_reiko
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    Re: Translation Central

    Post by kare_reiko on Wed Nov 27, 2013 4:33 pm

    I, myself don't have any requests right now but I may PM you when I will sit on translation of Shion story in Xenosaga Freaks (last part to translate) and I will need some second opinion when I will make it. But it won't be any sooner then after new year I think when things in my work will calm down Smile.
    Or if you are bored I can ask for two more chapters of Xenosaga DS Wink...


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    Re: Translation Central

    Post by Neosmith on Thu Nov 28, 2013 2:03 am

    @Gwendal wrote:Sorry it's been a little while, but just a reminder that I'm still checking in you need anything else translated. Smile

    If not, feel free to send me a PM (here or GameFAQs or wherever) any time later if you find any other interesting Japanese materials.

    Thank you very much for your work Gwendal!

    I really love these latest pieces on Xenosaga.

    I apologize for not being more responsive - I've been swamped with work the past few days and unable to do much posting.

    I was definitely hoping to ask for more Episode II Who's Who translations and the Voice Actors for E2 as well, but it'll take a little time to find the links for those.

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    Re: Translation Central

    Post by Gwendal on Thu Nov 28, 2013 8:27 am

    @Neosmith wrote:
    @Gwendal wrote:Sorry it's been a little while, but just a reminder that I'm still checking in you need anything else translated. Smile

    If not, feel free to send me a PM (here or GameFAQs or wherever) any time later if you find any other interesting Japanese materials.

    Thank you very much for your work Gwendal!

    I really love these latest pieces on Xenosaga.

    I apologize for not being more responsive - I've been swamped with work the past few days and unable to do much posting.

    I was definitely hoping to ask for more Episode II Who's Who translations and the Voice Actors for E2 as well, but it'll take a little time to find the links for those.

    Glad you liked them! And it's fine, I expected it was something like that. Just wanted to let you guys know I haven't just up and left or anything. Smile
    I'll gladly work on those things when you dig up the links.

    kare_reiko: Sure, just let me know. I don't mind doing some DS chapters as well, but just one thing I'm unsure about...isn't there already a group working on those for a ROM hack project or something? Just want to make sure we don't end up translating the same things twice. Smile

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    Re: Translation Central

    Post by Neosmith on Thu Nov 28, 2013 11:34 am

    Judging from everything, the Romhackers should be pretty much finished with the translation, but they probably have a bunch of testing and all that before they come out with the game. I estimate that we'll get a release somewhere in first quarter 2014. So, I also don't think it'd be a good idea to translate those chapters.
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    Valkyrie

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    Re: Translation Central

    Post by Valkyrie on Sun Dec 01, 2013 1:08 pm

    Hi this is Valkyrie,

    Here is my request :
    "Xenosaga Pied Piper" Fan Manga : what's next ?

    I speak about the "Xenosaga Pied Piper"

    fan manga translated in English by the team composed of kare, porimac and some others I don't remember (sorry).

    The first 3 chapters are here :
    https://www.dropbox.com/s/v96xeurctioo7vg/Xenosaga_Pied_Piper_Fan%20Manga.zip

    You can also "watch" the beginning of chapter 4 (in Japanese) here (watch it on a PC, not smartphone nor Ipad) :
    http://www.nicotwitter.com/watch/nm18675738

    So here is the situation :
    I recently tried  to contact the guy who does this manga by posting a comment on its blog (date : (30/11/13), here :
    http://mori-meikyu.jugem.jp/
    In fact I wanted to ask him if he will continue the manga, and if he has some interesting stuff concerning Xenosaga Pied Piper (that we don't have in the non-Japanese-speaking countries).

    He answered me (see 01/12/13), but in Japanese. Is there anybody who will be so kind to translate its answer ?
    He seems to be motivated to go on, but I can't trust the translation of Google Traduction, it is too confusing.

    Here is the text :


    返信。
       2013.12.01 Sunday 23:59
        名無しさんからコメントをいただきまして、
       æ¬¡å‹•ç”»ã„つになるのか?ということですが、
       ç¢ºå®Ÿã«ä»Šæœˆä¸­ã«ã‚¢ãƒƒãƒ—する予定でおります。

       æœ€ä½Žé™ä¼‘日が3日は欲しいところですが、
       12月も次々と休みが消えていく悲しい現状もありまして、
       ç§è‡ªèº«è‡ªå·±ç®¡ç†ã—つつ完成まで持っていきます。

       ãªã®ã§ä»Šã—ばらくお待ちいただければと思います。

       ãƒ–ログでは結構ヘラヘラしてますが
       å®Ÿã¯æ¯Žæ—¥å‹•ç”»ã®ã“としか考えておりません。

       ç§ã‚‚早くPP描きたいので。

       -――――――――――

       Valkyrieさん

       ã‚³ãƒ¡ãƒ³ãƒˆã‚りがとうございます。

       2つの質問ですね。お答えは日本語でよろしいでしょうか?

       1) Are you planning to continue this video manga ? You are half-way already, and the results are awesome !

       A:もちろん続けます。
       ã‚‚しも私がこの動画だけ作っていればいい人間であれば
       ã‹ãªã‚Šã®ã‚¹ãƒ”ードで制作できるのですが、
       ç¾å®Ÿçš„にそうもいきません。
       ç”Ÿæ´»ã™ã‚‹ãŠé‡‘は、きつい肉体労働で稼いでこなくてはならないので
       æ™‚間も精神も体力も最近は疲弊する一方です。

       ã§ã‚‚、完結させるのが私の使命です。
       ãŠã“がましくも、恐らく私にしかできないとも思っています。

       2) You know Xenosaga Pied Piper was never available outside Japan. Since you do a manga about this, I guess you own this "game" on your phone. Would you be so kind to give some contents you have of this game (image, walkthrough videos, records, music, or maybe the data of the game itself���).
       Or if you know a video showing the walkthrough of the game, could you give me the link, please (never mind if it is in Japanese) ?

       A:ゼノサーガPPは日本の携帯電話にしか配信されておらず、
       ã•ã‚‰ã«ãã®ä»–に情報が流れることも一切なかった
       æ—¥æœ¬å›½å†…でも非常に非常にレアな作品です。
       ç§ã¯è‡ªåˆ†ã®æŒã£ã¦ã„るゲームから手書きでシナリオを書き写したりして
       ä½œæ¥­ã—ていたため、誰かがアップした映像媒体等を参考にしたことはありませんし
       èª°ã‚‚一切やろうとはしませんでした。

       ã‚€ã—ろ、無いからこそ私が漫画にしようと思いましたし、
       å‹•ç”»ã‚’作り始めたのです。

       ãã—て未だに(イメージ、チュートリアル ビデオ、レコード、音楽、ゲーム自体のデータ)の類の
       æ˜ åƒåª’体を見たことはありません。
       ã“のPPという作品は私が漫画にしなければ
       æã‚‰ããƒ•ã‚¡ãƒ³ã®é–“でもごく一部の人しか知らない
       å¤±ã‚ã‚Œã¦ã„く作品です。

       ç¾ã«ãƒ¢ãƒŽãƒªã‚¹ã‚½ãƒ•ãƒˆã¯ä»Šã€ã‚¼ãƒŽãƒ–レイドシリーズを制作しており、
       æ‚²ã—いことですがもうモノリスもナムコもPPに携わることはないと思います。

       ã—かし、私にはそれを形にする力があります。

       ç¾åœ¨ã¯è‹¦ã—い時間制限の中、頑張っていくしかない状態ですが、
       å‹•ç”»å†…でも度々言っているとおり常にNever Give Upの精神です。
       äººé–“の体って趣味より先に「食べなきゃ生きていけない」不便さが
       ã‚りますよね。なんとかならないものでしょうかね?w
       æ¼«ç”»ã§æš®ã‚‰ã—ているわけではないところと、
       åŸºæœ¬çš„に私一人でアニメ制作工程を全てやっているようなものなので、
       æ®‹å¿µãªãŒã‚‰ç°¡å˜ã§ã¯ã‚りません。

       ã§ã‚‚生きている限り成し遂げてみせます。

       ä»¥ä¸Šã§ã™ã€‚
       ã•ã—あたっては今月アップする考察の方の動画を楽しみにしていただけたらと思います。

       ãã‚Œã§ã¯ã¾ãŸä½•ã‹ã‚りましたらコメントください。

    Gwendal

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    Re: Translation Central

    Post by Gwendal on Thu Dec 05, 2013 10:53 am

    Here's the translation. Sorry it's taken a little while, but since there weren't any requests I've been a bit lax checking this topic the last few days.

    Reply.
    2013.12.01 Sunday 23:59

    Anonymous, I received your comment asking when I'd do the next movie, and I'm actually planning on uploading it [sometime] this month.

    I'd like to have at least three free days, and since I unfortunately won't have too many days off in a row during December, I'll have to bring it to completion while also doing the [management/processing] myself.

    So that means you'll probably have to wait a little while for now.

    Maybe they'll laugh at me at the blog for this, but they [or "I", but probably "they"] honestly don't think about anything other than those movies every day.

    I also want to show PP soon.
    ---------------------------------------
    Valkyrie-san

    Thank you for your comment.

    You have two questions, I see. I hope you don't mind me answering in Japanese?

    Question 1

    A: Of course I'm going to continue. If I were to just make these movies, I might be able to finish them rather quickly with some good effort, but I don't think that's too feasible. For one thing, I have to do hard manual labor to earn money for my living expenses, so that means I've been short on time as well as mental and physical energy lately.

    But I'm on a mission to get this finished. Maybe I'm being presumptuous here, but I think I'm the only one who can do it.

    Question 2

    A: Xenosaga PP was only made available on cell phones in Japan, so there was no other way to get that information. The game is very, very rare even in Japan. I transcribed the scenario text myself from my own game to use for my project, so I didn't consult any videos someone had uploaded or anything like that, and no one has done this before at all.

    Rather, it's precisely because there wasn't anything available before that I thought I'd make it into a manga, and started working on my movies.

    Even now, I still haven't seen any media with content like (images, tutorial videos, music, the game data itself). If I don't make this manga, PP might end up as a "lost game" that's only known to a minority even amongst the fans.

    In actual fact, Monolith are making the Xenoblade series now, and even if it's a bit sad, I don't think they or Namco care about PP anymore.

    So that's what motivates me to give it this form.

    Right now I'm working with severe limitations on my time, in a situation where there's nothing else to do but the best I can, and my mental state is one of "never giving up", like it's also said several times in the movies themselves. The human body demands that you put eating in order to live above hobbies. It's rather incovenient in that way, don't you think? That's just how it is, I suppose. Smile
    I can't live in mangas, and I'm basically doing all the work required to create an anime, which unfortunately isn't easy.

    But as long as I'm alive, I'll see it through to the end.

    That's all. For the time being, I think you can look forward to my planned uploads this month.

    If there's anything else, please do comment.
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    Valkyrie

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    Re: Translation Central

    Post by Valkyrie on Sat Dec 07, 2013 8:21 am

    Thanks a lot Gwendal !

    It was quite instructive for me.

    It explains why Chaoslace (the person who translated in English the script of Xenosaga Pied Piper) and other fans didn't find many contents (images, videos, music) on Internet concerning this game.

    Also, it shows that this person (フォ️レスト ~ Forest) (actually I don't know the gender) is still motivated to do this manga. Good news :nice:

    P.S. : When the translation patch of Xenosaga I.II (Nintendo DS) will be released, I will notice it immediately on Xeno-underground.
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    Re: Translation Central

    Post by kare_reiko on Sat Dec 07, 2013 1:58 pm

    It's heart breaking to read what happen to PP, it's one of best parts of Xenosaga story and it ended like that...

    Well I'm checking almost everyday his blog so I was sure he still working on it, he now doing one vid for PP and then he doing a Xenosaga character profile vids, and now he's in middle of making Kossy vid (he done all pictures of all versions of Kos-mos)


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    Valkyrie

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    Re: Translation Central

    Post by Valkyrie on Mon Dec 16, 2013 5:40 am

    kare_reiko wrote :
    Well I'm checking almost everyday his blog so I was sure he still working on it, he now doing one vid for PP and then he doing a Xenosaga character profile vids, and now he's in middle of making Kossy vid (he done all pictures of all versions of Kos-mos)

    Today he has finished his videos dealing with KOS-MOS and Nephilim.

    You can check them here :

    http://mori-meikyu.jugem.jp/

    Now we may hope he will continue his work on Xenosaga Pied Piper fan manga :nice:
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    Re: Translation Central

    Post by stitchedmoon on Mon Dec 16, 2013 7:34 pm

    @kare_reiko wrote:It's heart breaking to read what happen to PP, it's one of best parts of Xenosaga story and it ended like that...

    Yeah, as if the game itself wasn't sad enough, it's depressing to hear that it's been virtually forgotten even in Japan. T__T  (I still really want to play it someday, but I guess that belongs on my permanent unattainable wishlist along with the Ziggy action figure and a real live flying magical rainbow unicorn pony. :< )  It's great to hear from the fan manga artist though!  I'm glad they're still interested in continuing it. <3


    Last edited by stitchedmoon on Sun May 01, 2016 1:27 pm; edited 1 time in total


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    Re: Translation Central

    Post by kare_reiko on Wed Dec 18, 2013 10:54 am

    It's nice that he'd finish it.
    I watched first two parts. At first he explain Anima and Animus power, he talk how it was shown in Xenogears too. He talk about Mary and what we know about Ancient Lost Yerusalem past. He finish first part at creation of Ver1 KOS-MOS.
    Second part is where he shortly presents all Kossy Versions. How was destroyed last version and making of next one. At end we have more explain about genesis of T-elos, Wilhelm plans for T-los and Kos-mos, in the end he talks about KOS-MOS shortening Shion's life...

    I will watch more when I will have awhile Wink


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    Re: Translation Central

    Post by Valkyrie on Thu Jan 16, 2014 12:06 pm

    Hi,

    It seems he is planning to draw the following of Xenosaga Pied Piper soon.

    Maybe thoses drawings are just for fun or for training, but still, it is a good omen :

    http://mori-meikyu.jugem.jp/?eid=1739#trackback

    http://mori-meikyu.jugem.jp/?eid=1740#trackback
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    Re: Translation Central

    Post by kare_reiko on Thu Jan 16, 2014 2:54 pm

    It will look like spam but I only say:

    Yay! Smile


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